Girl Who Speaks Her Mind

xrosemaidenx:

veteranfangirl:

Conceal, don’t feel. Don’t let them know.

"[With Elsa, it] definitely was intentional to show anxiety and depression." - JENNIFER LEE (x)

THIS IS ONE OF THE REASONS THIS MOVIE IS SO IMPORTANT. 

Like yes, I agree with the major criticisms going around tumblr re: racism and heteronormativity and not enough major female characters YES, they’re all valid points.  I just don’t understand the bloodlust towards Frozen more than, say, Tangled.  These issues aren’t unique to this movie; they’re widespread societal problems and that leaks into our media.  It can still be a good/enjoyable movie.  I see you SJWers enjoying Aladdin at the same time and that shit’s racist as hell.  Just because something has problematic elements doesn’t make it bad.

BUT THIS CHARACTER IS SO FUCKING IMPORTANT.  Because little girls are obsessed with her, they’re latching on to her.  Little girls love Elsa.  And she’s a Disney Princess with major neuroses.  (I know this is Anna’s story but Elsa’s more popular.)  And it shows a main female character with major anxiety and depression issues, and it shows her as a powerful, strong, loving person around those issues, and it shows her as an incredibly positive character. 

A lot of people are saying that the story would’ve been better if Elsa’d been the antagonist, and she was originally intended to be until that changed in development.  And you know what, it’s for the best because she’s a protagonist with mental issues.  It’s easy and common to give those to a villain.  Villains are twisted and they hurt people because they’re not Good People.  Disney Princesses might not be perfect but they’re damn close to it and their faults are charming and cute and not crippling.  Elsa’s issues and her failure to deal with them are crippling.

So many teens and adults have identified with her issues, and seeing them portrayed in a positive and beloved character is so fucking important, because children see that not just scary weirdos have mental issues.  Elsa hurts people because of her issues.  She doesn’t mean to but she hurts her parents and sister and kingdom and strangers, emotionally and physically.  And she’s a Good Guy.  Not only is she a Good Guy, she’s a Disney Princess.  They’re not supposed to hurt people — except oh maybe hurt feelings because they were following their dreams or something saccharine like that.

And she makes a series of bad choices, selfish choices, because she can’t deal with her issues.  Just like real people.  She’s not a bad person because she makes bad choices stemming from her neuroses.  Little kids see someone who’s awesome! with anxiety and depression and they see that she’s more than just her issues, and she’s deserving of love

I’m crying. The first time I saw this movie I turned to my girlfriend at the exact point when Elsa is muttering, don’t feel, don’t feel as her ice palace grows dark and jagged all around her, and I said, “This is showcasing anxiety as Elsa’s main emotion. She keeps trying to get it under control but she can’t and it just makes it worse when she tries to stop.” I love this movie so much.  Also when her Father says “Getting upset only makes it worse, calm down.” Like, you can’t calm down when you’re feeling that way and that is the absolute worst thing to say to someone in that situation. THIS MOVIE

"[With Elsa, it] definitely was intentional to show anxiety and depression." - JENNIFER LEE (x)

funnuraba:

SHOUTOUT TO CATS FOR GETTING THEIR CLAWS STUCK IN THINGS AND THEN WHEN YOU HELP THEY GET OFFENDED THAT YOU TOUCHED THEIR PAW

thegirlwhostoletheworld:


So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 


#this#of course he’s pretentious#but thats a credit to john green#for creating a flawed character that is still loveable#because he truly reflected humanity in Gus#it doesn’t matter who you love#they still have flaws#and this is just one of Augustus’.

thegirlwhostoletheworld:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

#this#of course he’s pretentious#but thats a credit to john green#for creating a flawed character that is still loveable#because he truly reflected humanity in Gus#it doesn’t matter who you love#they still have flaws#and this is just one of Augustus’.

free-will-for-the-fallen:

nachosinthetardis:

maxhole:

if u dont think moaning is the hottest shit u can get right outta town

image

*slow clap for the Harry Potter fandom*

playbilly:

I have been waiting so long for this gifset for so long you have no idea

imstilllfighting:

Alright. I study photography at school and a couple of weeks ago, we had to participate with a photography-contest called “contrast”. You could choose whatever you wanted: young-old, poor-rich, boy-girl, city-nature etc. I didn’t want something cliche and decided to show the contrast between someone who has self harm scars, and someone who hasn’t. No one of my class knows the left arm is mine, but I showed the picture to everyone to present it and I said that scars don’t have to define you. I thought everyone would be like “ew”, but everyone thought it was a really nice picture and I did a good job. They weren’t the only one who thought that though, because a week ago I got an email from the contest, saying I got more info this week. Yesterday I saw some pictures of the jury who were looking at the elected pictures, and guess what I saw? My picture. This photo is probably going to be exhibited in december, and I’m actually really proud of myself. I am not gloryfying anything, I do not think my scars are beautiful nor do I like them. I’m just not ashamed of them, and I don’t care what anyone else says about it. I only wanted to point out the contrast, because that were the intentions of the contest. So here it is, someone asked for me to post it. 

imstilllfighting:

Alright. I study photography at school and a couple of weeks ago, we had to participate with a photography-contest called “contrast”. You could choose whatever you wanted: young-old, poor-rich, boy-girl, city-nature etc. I didn’t want something cliche and decided to show the contrast between someone who has self harm scars, and someone who hasn’t. No one of my class knows the left arm is mine, but I showed the picture to everyone to present it and I said that scars don’t have to define you. I thought everyone would be like “ew”, but everyone thought it was a really nice picture and I did a good job. They weren’t the only one who thought that though, because a week ago I got an email from the contest, saying I got more info this week. Yesterday I saw some pictures of the jury who were looking at the elected pictures, and guess what I saw? My picture. This photo is probably going to be exhibited in december, and I’m actually really proud of myself. I am not gloryfying anything, I do not think my scars are beautiful nor do I like them. I’m just not ashamed of them, and I don’t care what anyone else says about it. I only wanted to point out the contrast, because that were the intentions of the contest. So here it is, someone asked for me to post it. 

capn-devdev:

castielcampbell:

221pies-in-the-tardis:

selizabeth22:

ultrafacts:

More facts? Visit the Ultrafacts tumblr Blog

Why is George holding the phone upside down?

isn’t the fact that he’s george bush enough of an answer ?

Is no one going to talk about the SQUIRRELS that hunt DOGS in Russia??

is no one going to talk about the green children

jennlferlawrence:

this is so important

jennlferlawrence:

this is so important

blood-just-like-the-atlantic:

the constant struggle of “should I reread one of my favorite books because it’s so amazing and it makes me happy every time i read it” or “should i read a new book and expand my horizons” is SO FUCKING HARD

disneyaddictgirl:

swingkatieswing:

bri-ecrit:

ianonthedaily:

The animation changes but the Disney magic stays the same

YES

PERFECTION

To think its 63 YEARS in between the two films is an amazing thing.

thatwetshirt:

Just once I want my life to be like an 80’s movie, preferably one with a really awesome musical number for no apparent reason. But no, no, John Hughes did not direct my life.

harvestheart:

Prodigy

harvestheart:

Prodigy

flash-thunder:

Women make up 45% of the gaming community and 0% of the protagonists of the 25 biggest games of the year.

"Yes, but that’s still a minority! If more women played video games, there would be more reason to have female protagonists!"

Men make up 35% of the cinema audience and 84% of the protagonists of the 25 biggest movies of the year.