Girl Who Speaks Her Mind
o-my-boys:

#OH MY GOD#THEY SKIPPED SCHOOL#TO AUDITION FOR THE FILM#NO FUCKING WONDER THEY GOT THE PART#THAT IS LITERALLY SOMETHING#FRED AND GEORGE WOULD HIGH FIVE OVER

running4thehigh:

Just in case no one told you today:

  • Good morning
  • You’re beautiful
  • I love you
  • Nice butt

wocinsolidarity:

fuckallies:

On average, you have a 1 in 18,989 chance of being murdered

A trans person has a 1 in 12 chance of being murdered

The average life span of a cis person is about 75-90 

The average life expectancy of a trans person is 23-30 years old

75% of people killed in anti LGBT hate crimes are poc

Think about this the next time you go crying over “cisphobia” and “reverse racism”

MESSAGE 

chaoticbanter:

catsbeaversandducks:

Comic by ©The Oatmeal

I laugh, but it’s frighteningly true

earthdaughter:

worclip:

The Drinkable Book

Concept design for Water is Life

Chemist: Dr Theresa Dankovich
Biochemical Engineer: Corinne Clinch

Chief Creative Officer: Matt Eastwood
Executive Creative Director: Menno Kluin
Group Creative Director: Andrew McKechnie
Head of Design: Juan Carlos Pagan
Associate Creative Director: Sam Shepherd
Associate Creative Director: Frank Cartagena
Senior Designer: Brian Gartside
Designer: Aaron Stephenson

The Drinkable Book is a life saving tool that filters water and teaches proper sanitation & hygiene to those in the developing world. 

Each book is printed on technologically advanced filter paper, capable of killing deadly waterborne diseases. And each page is coated with silver nanoparticles, whose ions actively kill diseases like cholera, typhoid and E. coli. 

Once water is passed through the filter, bacteria count is reduced by over 99.99%, making the filtered water comparable to tap water in the United States of America.

The paper costs only pennies to produce, making it by far the cheapest option on the market. Each filter is capable of giving someone up to 30 days worth of clean water. And each book is capable of providing someone with clean water for up to 4 years.


SPREAD THIS LIKE FUCKING WILD FIRE

gokuma:

me VS life

gokuma:

me VS life

You being sick is not an imperfection.
Pretty Little Liars (Spencer Hastings in “The Perfect Storm”)

hawberries:

THAT’S ALL OF THEM! i did it, i drew every single starter………..’s unevolved form yay me. sorry for uploading this same thing three times in two days but i am just very excited about having done a lineless experiment i’m actually pleased with uvu

you can get these on stickers!
or on other stuff!

zaccharine:

honestly my favorite thing ive ever made in photoshop is catloaf

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my graphic arts teacher hung it on the wall in the ga computer lab

missflurry:

flowersinthelibrary:

The Elephant House, “birthplace of Harry Potter”, located in George IV Bridge Street in Edinburgh, UK. One of the cafés where JK Rowling spent time writing, in 1995. The toilets are covered with messages, thank you notes and quotations from the books written by the fans.

ALL RIGHT IM SITTING IN THE CAFE RIGHT NOW AND IM GONNA GO TO THE BATHROOM

krisarchasm:

mistressofpie:

A super girly and peppy blonde girl who wears bright pink dresses and skirts everyday is best friends with a quiet goth girl who of course sports all black clothing and big lace up boots. Someone jokes and yells to them “Hey look, a fairy and a vampire!” The blonde turns around and flashes a fanged grin and says “She’s human actually.”

image

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This has been done before, I’m sure.

invisiblelad:

mostingeniusparadox:

Legends of the Dark Knight #49

I’ve always felt this way too, Harley. 

thecutestofthecute:

English Cream Dachshund 

A few months back, I was asked to participate in a debate on the topic of whether men should have to pay on dates. (I was “the feminist.”) It turned out that the male debater and I didn’t really disagree much on that topic. I said that, generally, whoever asks the other person out pays for that date, and then at some point couples generally transition into sharing costs in whatever way works for them. He was actually pretty happy to pay for first dates; he just wanted women to say thank you and to not use him. I had no problem with that.

I think he said that women should offer to pay half, knowing they’ll probably be turned down. I said, well, sometimes — but what if the other person invited you someplace really expensive? What if you agreed to a date with the guy and he spent an hour saying crazy racist shit to you and you felt like you couldn’t escape? This is what led to our real disagreement.

The male debater felt strongly that if a woman wasn’t interested in a second date, she should say so on the spot. If the man says, “Let’s do this again sometime,” the woman shouldn’t say, “Sure, great,” and then back out later. I said that that was a nice ideal, but that he should keep in mind that most women spent most of their lives living in low-level fear of physical aggression from men. I think about avoiding rape (or other violence) every time I walk home from the subway, every time there’s an unexpected knock at the door, and certainly every time I piss off an unhinged man. So, if I were on a date with a man who I felt was unbalanced, creepy, overly aggressive, or possibly violent, and he asked if I wanted to “do this again sometime,” I would say whatever I felt would avoid conflict. And then I would leave, wait awhile, and hope that letting him down politely a few days later would avoid his finding me and turning my skin into an overcoat.

The male debater was furious that I had even brought this up. He felt that the threat of violence against women was irrelevant, and that I was playing some kind of “rape card” as a debate trick. He got angrier and angrier as we argued. I also got angrier and angrier, although I worked hard to keep speaking in a calm and considered way. He was shouting and cutting me off when I tried to speak. I pointed out that the debater himself was displaying exactly the sort of behavior that would make me very uncomfortable on a date. THAT made him livid.

He then called me “passive-aggressive.”

I was genuinely taken aback. “Actually,” I said, “I call this ‘behaving myself.’” It’s a lot of work to stay calm when you’re just as furious as the other person, and that other person is shouting at you. I felt that I was acting like a grownup — at some emotional cost to myself — and I wanted credit, not insults, for being able to speak in a normal tone of voice when I was having to explain things like, “We can’t tell who the rapists are before they turn violent, so sometimes we have to be cautious with men who do not intend to harm us.”